July 30, 2014

J. Frank Dobie Collection, 1910-1991

    James Frank Dobie was born on September 26, 1888 in Live Oak County, Texas, to Richard J. and Ella Dobie. At the age of sixteen he went to live with his Grandparents in Alice, Texas where he completed high school. He enrolled in Southwestern University where he was introduced to English Poetry and met Bertha McKee, whom he married in 1916. After graduating in 1910 Dobie worked for the Galveston Tribune and the San Antonio Express, before attaining a high school teaching job in Alpine. He moved on to teach at the Southwestern Preparatory School and later earned his M.A. from Columbia University. In 1914 he joined the University of Texas faculty and as well as the Texas Folklore Society. He left the University and served for two years in field artillery during World War I.

     After returning to Texas, Dobie published his first articles as a newspaperman in 1919. He made the decision to resign from his position at the University of Texas in 1920 in order to manage his Uncle Jim Dobie’s ranch. It was during his time on the ranch that Dobie’s passion for describing aspects of Texas lifestyle and culture was developed. Dobie was named the secretary of the Folklore Society in April of 1922. His first book, Vaquero of the Brush Country, was published in 1929. His other publications include: The Voice of the Coyote, The Mustangs, Tales of Old Time Texas, Up the Trail From Texas, I’ll Tell You a Tale and Cow People. He also wrote for the Southwestern Review and a Sunday newspaper column. Dobie died on September 18, 1964. Several schools and other buildings were named in Dobie’s honor and he was posthumously inducted into the Texas Heroes Hall of Honor.

   The materials that make up this collection portray J. Frank Dobie’s interests in and contributions to the Texas Folklore Society. The predominant themes are Texas folklore and culture, cattle branding, Dobie’s time in England as a professor at Cambridge and his World War I experiences.

     Significantly, there is also a file of illustrations of cattle brands which were sent back and forth between SHSU faculty members Frances McMinn and Emma Normand and, we believe, J. Frank Dobie. These illustrations were eventually used to create a quilt depicting cattle branding as art.

   View a detailed finding aid of his collection at Sam Houston State University’s Archon page and see just what materials are in the collection.

J Frank Dobie Collection, 1910-1991

Digitized materials from the J. Frank Dobie Collection, 1910-1991



July 29, 2014
uispeccoll:

Miniature Monday!  (I made it…).
This tiny mini blank book is chained to its larger relative, and fits in the little recess in the cover. 
Statement from the artist’s website: (Click here!)
"Until fairly recently all books were prized possessions — medieval libraries chained books to the shelves to prevent theft. In those days each volume was crafted with precision, elaborately decorated and embellished with precious stones and metals. I aim to make my books just as precious as those medieval manuscripts."
[Chained book on a book].  [Asheville, NC : Dan Essig, 1999]
Catalog: N7433.4.E55 C5 1999a 
See all of our Miniature Monday posts.

uispeccoll:

Miniature Monday!  (I made it…).

This tiny mini blank book is chained to its larger relative, and fits in the little recess in the cover. 

Statement from the artist’s website: (Click here!)

"Until fairly recently all books were prized possessions — medieval libraries chained books to the shelves to prevent theft. In those days each volume was crafted with precision, elaborately decorated and embellished with precious stones and metals. I aim to make my books just as precious as those medieval manuscripts."

[Chained book on a book].  [Asheville, NC : Dan Essig, 1999]

Catalog: N7433.4.E55 C5 1999a 

See all of our Miniature Monday posts.



July 28, 2014
shsusportscoll:

SHSU Hosting the Lone Star Conference Tournament in the Johnson Coliseum (then the “University Coliseum”), 1981.

shsusportscoll:

SHSU Hosting the Lone Star Conference Tournament in the Johnson Coliseum (then the “University Coliseum”), 1981.



July 25, 2014
shsusportscoll:

Dr. Templeton and one SHSU Football player share a moment during a practice on Pritchett Field in October, 1969.

shsusportscoll:

Dr. Templeton and one SHSU Football player share a moment during a practice on Pritchett Field in October, 1969.



July 22, 2014
A picture of the 1884-1885 faculty at the Sam Houston Normal Institute
The Institute, which had been founded 5 years prior, would eventually become Sam Houston State University after a series of name changes in the 20th century.
If you are interested in Sam Houston State University history, University Archives is open Monday-Friday from 8am to 5pm or you can just call our University Archivist at (936) 294-3699.

A picture of the 1884-1885 faculty at the Sam Houston Normal Institute

The Institute, which had been founded 5 years prior, would eventually become Sam Houston State University after a series of name changes in the 20th century.

If you are interested in Sam Houston State University history, University Archives is open Monday-Friday from 8am to 5pm or you can just call our University Archivist at (936) 294-3699.

(Source: library.shsu.edu)



July 21, 2014

shsusportscoll:

A 1980 Softball game near the new University Coliseum. The coliseum, now known as the Bernard G. Johnson Coliseum, was completed in 1976. It was named the Bernard G. Johnson Coliseum on December 12, 1987.

This field is now the site of the Health and Kinesiology Building.



July 20, 2014
New John W. Thomason drawings added to Digital Collections
After months of reorganizing and digitizing the collection of Navy Cross recipient John W. Thomason, we are glad to announce the addition of rare and unseen John W. Thomason drawings to our digital collections. Over 150 drawings that were hidden or misplaced were digitized and described online. Many of the drawings are sketches that would take shape in later works. Thomason developed a habit of recording his surroundings in his drawing notebooks or on whatever scrap of paper he had nearby. His sketches include scenes of wildlife, his life in China and Central America, and the human body. Take a look and see if there are any that you enjoy.
See the new additions: new additions
See the whole  collection at : John W. Thomason drawings

New John W. Thomason drawings added to Digital Collections

After months of reorganizing and digitizing the collection of Navy Cross recipient John W. Thomason, we are glad to announce the addition of rare and unseen John W. Thomason drawings to our digital collections. Over 150 drawings that were hidden or misplaced were digitized and described online. Many of the drawings are sketches that would take shape in later works. Thomason developed a habit of recording his surroundings in his drawing notebooks or on whatever scrap of paper he had nearby. His sketches include scenes of wildlife, his life in China and Central America, and the human body. Take a look and see if there are any that you enjoy.

See the new additions: new additions

See the whole  collection at : John W. Thomason drawings



July 18, 2014
Hey Tumblr followers!
We are proud to announce a new Tumblr webpage created by the SHSU Special Collections and University Archives Departments’ intern Amanda Chang, which spotlights SHSU Sports teams from seasons past. The “Sports @ Sam” Tumblr updates each Monday and Friday with a new photograph showcasing athletes from the 1980s, ‘70s, ‘60s, and beyond. Many of the photographs come from a recently digitized collection of color slides dating from the late 1960s to the early 1980s, which feature mostly baseball, basketball, football, golf, and softball photographs. The slides were originally created by the Sam Houston News Bureau in 1970s and the Sam Houston Public Information Office in the 1980s. Along with these photographs, older archived photos will also be posted.
                Athletes have been playing for Sam Houston State for over 100 years, starting out as the “Normals” when SHSU was known as a Normal Institute, and later switching to the “Bearkats.” Throughout the years our sports programs have developed into the strong teams which represent our University today. Our sports programs have grown along with the University, and this is reflected in many of the photographs that will be posted on Sports @ Sam. Not only do these photographs feature the athletes themselves, but also the fields and gymnasiums, and later stadiums and coliseums, that each team called home.
                Sports @ Sam offers an opportunity to look back on the teams that created a solid foundation for today’s student athletes. Sports @ Sam can be found at shsusportscoll.tumblr.com or @shsusportscoll, and the Special Collections and University Archives Departments’ Tumblr can be found at nglspecialcollectionsandarchives.tumblr.com or nglspecialcollectionsandarchives

Hey Tumblr followers!

We are proud to announce a new Tumblr webpage created by the SHSU Special Collections and University Archives Departments’ intern Amanda Chang, which spotlights SHSU Sports teams from seasons past. The “Sports @ Sam” Tumblr updates each Monday and Friday with a new photograph showcasing athletes from the 1980s, ‘70s, ‘60s, and beyond. Many of the photographs come from a recently digitized collection of color slides dating from the late 1960s to the early 1980s, which feature mostly baseball, basketball, football, golf, and softball photographs. The slides were originally created by the Sam Houston News Bureau in 1970s and the Sam Houston Public Information Office in the 1980s. Along with these photographs, older archived photos will also be posted.

                Athletes have been playing for Sam Houston State for over 100 years, starting out as the “Normals” when SHSU was known as a Normal Institute, and later switching to the “Bearkats.” Throughout the years our sports programs have developed into the strong teams which represent our University today. Our sports programs have grown along with the University, and this is reflected in many of the photographs that will be posted on Sports @ Sam. Not only do these photographs feature the athletes themselves, but also the fields and gymnasiums, and later stadiums and coliseums, that each team called home.

                Sports @ Sam offers an opportunity to look back on the teams that created a solid foundation for today’s student athletes. Sports @ Sam can be found at shsusportscoll.tumblr.com or @shsusportscoll, and the Special Collections and University Archives Departments’ Tumblr can be found at nglspecialcollectionsandarchives.tumblr.com or nglspecialcollectionsandarchives



July 16, 2014
todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969
From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

(via harriscountypl)



July 15, 2014
President's Reports to the Board of Regents

Take a look at our digital collection of early President’s Reports to the Texas Board of Regents from the 1930s and 40s. Get details on early faculty at Sam, building projects, and enrollment figures. These documents are useful to anyone wanting to know more about the early history of Sam Houston State University.

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